Latest

tax-commentary-5-%e2%80%93-dividend-paying-stocks-versus-non-dividend-paying-stocks

Written by Brent Soucie, Consultant, CPA, CA
September 2, 2014

In most circumstances, investors are encouraged to hold some fraction of their investment savings in stocks (equities), even throughout retirement years. With that in mind, common sense dictates that investors who are retired typically begin withdrawing from their investment accounts, whether it be to fund their lifestyles, or enjoy some hard earned recreation time.

This often begs the question – once an investor reaches retirement, should that investor shift some of his/her stock and equity investments from non-dividend paying sources into dividend paying sources? Presumably, a stream of dividends could provide a convenient method for withdrawing the funds needed to fund retirement expenses and/or hobbies.

Read more »

Go to our T.E. Wealth Blog


Events

More about our Events across Canada


Newsletters

by Steven Belchetz, President & Chief Investment Officer, T.E. Investment Counsel

This summer two of our consultants will celebrate significant anniversaries with T.E. Wealth – Maryse Ouellette of Montreal is crossing the 25-year milestone and Michael Giacomodonato of the same office will commemorate 30 years at T.E. Wealth. They join a growing number of T.E. Wealth consultants who have 20, or more, years of experience with us (for a complete list see Celebrating 20-plus years with T.E. Wealth). As a firm, the average tenure of our consultants is 15 years, a remarkable result given the current workplace culture of contract work and short-term postings. The advantage of this staying power at T.E. Wealth, to both our colleagues and our clients, can be summed up in one word – experience.

Read more »

View our complete Strategies Newsletter


Media & Press

via Globe and Mail | August 8, 2014

Mike and Morley are in their 40s with two children and a serious aversion to debt.

The mortgage they took out to buy their suburban Toronto home 14 years ago “was my first ever debt,” Mike writes in an e-mail. When the children came along, they had to borrow on a line of credit to buy vehicles and to help keep themselves afloat during parental leaves.

Although they earn $183,485 between them, “the experience of being in debt has been unbearable,” Mike writes. “I have been kept awake by the stress almost constantly,” he adds.

So large did the debts loom that every purchase, whether for weekly groceries or family vacations, seemed to be made on more borrowed money, he says.

Now, after years of “suffering, stress and sleeplessness,” Mike and Morley hope to have the last of their loans paid off by summer’s end.

Read more »

More about T.E. Wealth in the Community